Corvettes, Beer, Microcontrollers, and Future Plans

Once again, I’ve gotten out of stride with my posts. Last weekend was a rather busy weekend for me as I looked over a number of possible C3 Corvettes for sale. While there were some very nice Corvettes I looked at, I found that each one just had some flaws that I wasn’t prepared to deal with.

Classic Car Hunt

The Mid 70’s Corvettes were a very interesting time for the Corvette, because they went away from the all chrome trim that was found on most cars in the late sixties to early seventies. Also, the power specs started to go way down with the required addition of emissions equipment. Performance-wise, the mid seventies Corvettes were rather pathetic (the “high performance” option only made 225 hp in 1979) but GM made a ton of these cars (they made over 53,000 Corvettes in 1979). The way I look at it, these cars can be picked up at a pretty good price for a classic. I’m not too concerned about the originality, so I have no problem putting on some high performance modifications to give the car a bit more power than the factory specs. I still want the car to look and sound original, but if it’s modified under the hood, that’s fine with me.

1979 Corvette (Courtesy of Hemmings Blog: http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2012/11/02/petersen-to-pay-tribute-to-the-corvette-for-its-60th-anniversary/)

That being said, there are a lot of Corvettes out there to look at, and there are a lot that have hidden flaws that can become problematic very quickly. As with most cars that are 40 years old, rust is the biggest enemy. Corvettes had a steel frame which makes rust prevalent in these cars. Fixing rust can be one of the biggest expenses to owning a classic car. For my current scenario, I’d rather pay more up front and have a car with a decent frame than pay less for a car that needs more work. In all of my research on buying a classic, everyone has told me to save my money and buy the car that’s already at the point that I want it to be at, since it will cost a lot more money if I buy a car that’s cheaper but requires work to be done.

While I’m hoping to get a Corvette before the winter comes, I’m not going to jump on something just for the sake of getting a classic. I have a very specific idea about what I want. So my research continues as I look for my 1974-1979 Corvette.

Home Brew

In the world of beer, I just finished bottling my Dunkel Rye batch. I tried a sample during bottling and while it tastes like a German beer, I find it’s lacking the body that I was hoping for. What I’m discovering is I’m trying to make a beer that’s got a full body. I’m not looking for something as heavy as Guiness, but something that’s got a body similar to a Killian’s Red Ale. I haven’t decided what my next batch of beer is going to be yet, but it’s going to be something likely a bit lighter. I’ve made two dark beers, and I’d like to try a light beer. I’ll have more updates on how the Dunkel turns out in about 2 weeks when it’s done carbonating.

Siphoning Action
Siphoning Action
No Leaking This Time
No Leaking This Time
A Sample (No, it's not Scotch Wiskey)
A Sample (No, it’s not whiskey)
Replenished my Beer Supply Just in Time!
Replenished my Beer Supply Just in Time! (Second Row is Batch #2)

Beaglebone Black (Nerding Out)

I’ve been spending a lot of time preparing for my next challenge with the Beaglebone Black (BBB). While I haven’t made leaps and bounds towards my time-lapse rig, I’ve found I’ve been working a lot on just developing my understand of what the BBB can do. While it’s pretty basic in the world of embedded electronics, I managed to develop a temperature logging program that runs when the BBB is initially powered on. This is very nice in the sense that you don’t have to SSH into the BBB to get the program working. I can simply plug the power supply in when I’m ready to start logging temperatures and it will log them on a frequency that’s specified in the program. I found out how to start a program on boot from the following site. I’ve discovered that Adafruit is a great resource for learning about how to use the BBB. (The lesson for logging temperatures can be found here.) I added an LED into my circuit so that once the program was running, I could tell if the temperatures were being logged. It’s a green light thank blinks every time a data point is measured.

Temperature Logger with Green LED
Temperature Logger with Green LED (Arduino doesn’t do anything, it’s just for show)
Temperature Plot from Beaglebone Black Data Logger
Temperature Plot from Beaglebone Black Data Logger

As a test, I ran the program over the period just under 4 minutes. It’s just in my den and you can see I brought the temperature up a bit at the beginning, then it comes back to the temperature that’s in the room. As you can see, it’s a bit chilly in my house right now!

I had planned to run a test overnight to see the temperature change, however I made a mistake in my coding. When the program executes, it creates a file with only one name and overwrites any data that was previously on the file. So after I had set up the program, I let it run overnight and collect the data. I had to shut off the BBB and plug it into my ethernet cord to SSH in and get the data (It was in a different room than my internet router). I had forgotten that the program would run on boot, so when it rebooted, it wrote over the file I had created the night before and erased all the data I had collected! Sometimes you have to learn the hard way…

This is a pretty primitive way of logging temperature. There are other things I need to work out. For example, I’d like to work a button switch in that lets me start and stop the data logging process so I’m not relying on stopping Linux processes through the terminal.

Future Plans

My plan for the future is to use the temperature logger to see what the fermentation temperatures of my beer are. Right now I don’t have much control over it, but sometime in the future I’d like to add fermentation temperatures to my brewing experiences to see if manipulating the temperature they’re brewed in makes a significant difference. The only time I know it would make a difference is when brewing a lager versus an ale, since lagers require much lower fermentation temperatures. Logging the temperature gives me a chance to try and see what my beer fermentation temperatures are.

Fermentation Temperature Logger Sketch
Fermentation Temperature Logger Sketch

Once I get a little better at putting BBB scripts together, I’ll start showing the code I used for my programs. Since it’s a mish-mash of code that’s not commented at the moment, it doesn’t look very pretty and probably wouldn’t make much sense to someone looking to do something similar.

More to come!

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